Maximum Life in Minimum Space | publication

Macau | July 2009
Macau | July 2009

How much space does the average man, woman or family needs in order to live comfortably? And how to define the average man, woman or family? Do we measure him, her and them in economical and financial terms or in terms of personality and their relationship with other people, with their surrounding spiritual and cultural space? Is it more important to have a thousand friends online than being able to receive all of them in your house? Questions raised and, partly, answered in Maximum Life in Minimum Space 小空间,大生活 .

The text was published in the July issue of Interior Design China as the response to following analysis by editor-in-chief Helen Yao 姚京:

Spatial Growth came out our consideration on the current social situation and real estate market. The first idea was based on “Live in one own VS space growth”. It seems two opposite matters but they actually relate with each other and constitute the relation between the people’s requirement on living size with their aging. The former means individual space for single and his/her lifestyle; the latter is about spatial pattern for family life. The former pays attentions to the spatial flexibility and the latter to the extension of space, and their precondition are set intentionally by us to the limited square meters (small space). The former is relevant to the sort of single persons who live in alone but gathering in group (single-cellular community and social configuration in such spatial mode), and the latter is relevant to the privacy and independent space in terms of multi persons living (individual care in pattern of living in group).

The Quarter Kilometer Block | arch. Avraham Yasky and Amnon Alexandroni (1962) | February, 2008
The Quarter Kilometer Block | arch. Avraham Yasky and Amnon Alexandroni (1962) | February, 2008

The contribution by Bert de Muynck | MovingCities talks about spatial growth in relation to the question of the Existenzminimum, the Delos Three (a cross-disciplinary think-thank including such people as C.A. Doxiadis, R. Buckminster Fuller, S. Giedion and Arnold Toynbee) and MovingCities observations such as contrary to what a lot of architects might think today, there are no universal standards that can be used in judging density.

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Maximum Life in Minimum Space 小空间,大生活 by Bert de Muynck | MovingCities
Published in Interior Design China, July, 2010

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