Shanghai >> Hangzhou

Shanghai - Hangzhou | April 26, 2012

A couple of years we ago explained the objective of repetitive research as way to look better, to look deeper, to see fragments of a fleeting city, to pick up new pieces, to arrange and re-arrange – while repeatedly taking the same road – those architectures one hasn’t noticed before. We present a new case study; a Shanghai 上海 to Hangzhou 杭州 comparison.

Territories need time. Time to grow, to change, to transform, to turn the soil into structures. There is no better past-time than to travel by train, to look left and right, to let the mind go back in time and the compare the what was and with the what is. These are the moments when one can mobilize the archive, capture that split-second, store and activate one year later.

Here is one:

Shanghai - Hangzhou | March 8, 2011

Shanghai - Hangzhou | April 26, 2012

And here another one. Note the landscaping and the new railroad in the right-corner:

Shanghai - Hangzhou | March 8, 2011

Shanghai - Hangzhou | April 26, 2012

And this the third case. A slightly different angle but note the constructions in the right corner (near the water) and clean-up in the back:

Shanghai - Hangzhou | March 8, 2011

Shanghai - Hangzhou | April 26, 2012

The more we do repetitive research, the more we need to rethink it. The second time can’t be simply a repetition of the first one. It should be about a cyclical movement, about understanding dominant forms of progress, about repetition of movement, a cinematic orchestra and remix of moving cities (youtube) that provokes the stimuli of observation, overtaking them automatically, not only in the memory (interior light) but first of all in the look, to the point that from now on it’s the speed of light itself which limits the reading of information and the important thing in electronic-information is no longer the storage but the display (Paul Virilio, The Aesthetics of Disappearance, 1991).

Here is the start of a new cycle, from Shanghai 上海 to Hangzhou 杭州.

Shanghai - Hangzhou | April 26, 2012

Pictures by movingcities.org

advised reading:
Virilio, Paul. The Aesthetics of Disappearance. by Adam Weg [University of Chicago]
Beyond Postmodernism? Paul Virilio’s Hypermodern Cultural Theory by John Armitage [ctheory]
An interview with Paul Virilio by Adam Weg [vice, 2011]

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