Guardian Cities | city bloggers

The Guardian Cities | Global city bloggers
Guardian Cities | city bloggers 2014

Two weeks ago, the Guardian, in collaboration with the Rockefeller Foundation, unveiled a new section of its website — Guardian Cities — so to shine a spotlight on the urbanisation of the world, whilst highlighting resilience, environmental, sustainability, social, and poverty issues…
MovingCities is very pleased to be included! As such we’ve selected 45 urban images from our 460 posts-archive  [see sitemap]. Continue reading “Guardian Cities | city bloggers”

Urban Flux #34 | INDONESIA Architecture

《Urban Flux 城市空间》#34 Indonesia Architecture | guest-edited by MovingCities 2013

Published in December 2013, MovingCities guest-edited a special bilingual [Chinese/English] 90-page issue of the Chinese architecture magazine Urban Flux 城市空间 设计 [vol 34 /2013-6] entitled “INDONESIAN ARCHITECTURE: TROPICAL AND EMERGING新兴崛起的印度尼西亚热带建筑. With this special report MovingCities, along with Indonesian architect Danny Wicaksono, gives a comprehensive overview of contemporary Indonesian architectural practices and insight into contemporary tropical architectural design. Continue reading “Urban Flux #34 | INDONESIA Architecture”

Urban Flux #34 INDONESIA Architecture Preface

《Urban Flux 城市空间设计》#34 'Indonesian Architecture' 印度尼西亚建筑 2013
URBAN FLUX magazine 《城市空间设计》VOL 34  2013年第6
Special Report 特别报道 PREFACE 前言

INDONESIA Architecture: Tropical and Emerging 新兴崛起的印度尼西亚热带建筑
Guest-editors 客座编辑: MovingCities /Bert de Muynck & Mónica Carriço 伯德孟 和 莫妮卡·卡瑞苏

INDONESIAN Architecture: Tropical and Emerging

On a random drive through many cities in Indonesia one encounters shopping malls, self-built houses, neo-Victorian villas, and mid- to high-rise buildings all in close proximity and, seemingly, all the result of an absence of urban planning. For example, in Jakarta – the capital of Indonesia – the population has grown from 4.8 million in 1975 to an expected 17.5 million by 2015, giving the impression that when it comes to architecture, anything goes. With Indonesia’s closeness to the Equator, architects have reacted to its hot and humid tropical climate-where daily temperatures range from 25-38°C-by internalizing living, leisure, and work, with shopping malls – catering to the burgeoning middle – class – being the epicenters of urban life and interior design ingenuity. Yet, the first signs of a more sustainable and contemporary approach to architecture in the world’s fourth largest country [population-wise] are beginning to show.

According to Andra Matin, one of Indonesia’s most acclaimed independent architects, “tropical design is more like an experimental eld rather than an established style”, leading to an architecture that tries to “find the best answer to ever-varying questions”. On being an architect in Indonesia, Andra Matin asserts, “our culture is like an unpolished diamond; and I believe this gives way too many possibilities. Because building regulations aren’t strict and the Indonesian culture is so diverse and rich, one has the freedom to put one’s inspiration to work.” Contemporary Indonesian architecture, reflecting the hundreds of cultures and thousands of islands in the archipelago, sets the attention to local conditions and infuses these with global inspiration.

While guest-editing this special issue of UrbanFlux, MovingCities and Indonesian architect Danny Wicaksono wishes to give a selected insight into the notions of tropical architectural design by focusing on what local architects have constructed, researched and learned. Most importantly, it is the embracing of the climatic condition as a design parameter that influences architectural designs and gives way to particular design strategies and use of materials. These climatic concerns are not new. When we look at fragments of Indonesia’s twentieth century architecture – whether buildings are developed by Dutch (Hendrik Petrus Berlage (1856-1934), C.P. Wolff Schoemaker (1882-1949)), under colonial circumstances, or American (a title=”Paul Rudolph | Jakarta + Surabaya | MovingCities” href=”https://movingcities.org/movingmemos/paul-rudolph-indonesia-july11/” target=”_blank”>Paul Rudolph (1918-1997)), prior to the 1990s recession – a concern for the incorporation of the climate and the local culture is at the center of the country’s critical construction tradition. For this issue, scholar Mohammad Nanda Widyarta puts focus on the country’s colonial architectural history, Danny Wicaksono traces the origins of contemporary independent architectural practice after 1998 and Farid Rakun critically questions the country’s current creative, architectural and urban development.

On the other hand, this magazine tries to capture the dawn of a new architectural awareness in today’s Indonesia. Due to social and economical development, young architects get oftentimes the chance to build. Initially limited to family houses and villas, these young architectural practices – such as SUB, d-associates, Studio Dasar, HGT Architects, Willis Kusuma Architects – are set to explore, oftentimes with very limited budgets, a new architectural language. At the very same time, an older generation of architects – such as aforementioned Andra Matin, or Adi Purnomo/mamostudio, Eko Prawoto, ABODAY and Studio TonTon – have for more than a decade sought and found their position as architects, now they need an critical eye, international appeal and approval.

Adi Purnomo is somewhat of an exception within Indonesian architecture. His practice, mamostudio, is a deliberately low staffed: “A small studio is like a mosquito that touches the surface of water without being immersed in it.” The architect, who is also a writer and researcher, conveys, “…on the other hand, its level of professionalism could be questioned. Therefore, I am experimenting with the productivity of this kind of studio model.” Here, his built projects and research studies are featured – addressing issues of population, food production and infrastructural development. Complementing these approaches, an emphasis was also laid on non-profit and community based architectural endeavors, hence the inclusion of artist/architect Eko Prawoto’s community-based reconstruction of an earthquake stricken area and the Rumah Asuh’s “Preservation of the Mbaru Niang”-project, which received the Aga Khan Award for Architecture in 2013 and is located in a very remote condition.

MovingCities and Danny Wicaksono wishes to thank UrbanFlux editorial team in providing the opportunity to present, for the first time, contemporary Indonesian architecture to a Chinese public

words by Bert de Muynck & Mónica Carriço / movingcities.org
December 2013

Urban Flux 城市空间 #34 | d-associates's Kalibata House & Studio TonTon's Bea House

Andra Matin | Rumah Agus Suwage [2012]

Adi Purnomo | Tanah Teduh, Jakarta, 2011

Intiland Tower [detail] by Paul Rudolph | 2011

Tropical Modernity, Life and Work of C.P. Wolff Schoemaker | SUN Architecture | 2011

印度尼西亚:新兴崛起的热带建筑

随意驾车在印尼的很多城市中穿行,你会发现很多购物商场、自建房、后维多利亚式别墅、中高层的塔楼都密集地坐落在一起,看起来好像没有任何规划而言。印尼的首都雅加达,城市人口预计从1975年的480万将增长到2015年的1 750万,这给人得出的印象和结论是:联系到建筑,无论什么样的都可以接受。再加上印尼离赤道很近,所以建筑师一般都会通过将居住、娱乐及工作空间置于室内,来回应湿热的气候环境;这里的日温可达到25到38摄氏度;而购物商场逐渐成为城市生活的中心及室内设计的展示平台,这也适应了不断增长的中产阶级的生活需求。即便如此,在这个全球第四人口大国内,一股可持续的、当代的建筑设计趋势将不可阻挡地降临。

印尼最著名的独立建筑师之一安德拉·马汀(Andra Matin)说过:“热带设计就好像一个实验场领域,而不是一种完成固定的风格。”这就将建筑引向“找寻解决不断变化的问题的答案”。作为印尼的一位建筑师,安德拉·马汀理解,“我们的文化就像一个未打磨的钻石,我相信这意味着更多的可能。因为建筑法规不是很严格,而且印尼文化非常丰富和多元,这样建筑师能够发挥的自由度也较大。”当代印尼建筑反映的是上百种多元文化及上千个印尼群岛岛屿,它将注意力聚焦当地条件,同时又融合国际设计灵感与风格。

作为本次《城市空间设计》的客座主编,MovingCities和印尼建筑师丹尼·维克索诺(Danny Wicaksono)希望能通过关注当地建筑师所建、所研究和所学习的内容,来深入介绍热带建筑设计这一概念。更重要的是,它将气候条件元素作为设计的重要考量点,从而形成一种特殊的设计策略和选材方法。这种对于气候的考虑并不是最近才有的。当你观察印尼20世纪遗留下来的部分建筑时,不管是由荷兰建筑师(贝尔拉格Berlage, 休梅克Schoemaker)在殖民时期设计的,还是由美国建筑师(保罗·鲁道夫Paul Rudolph)在20世纪末经济危机之前设计的作品,我们都能看到对于气候及当地文化的融入是这个国家建造传统的重要组成部分。对于这个话题,学者默罕默德·南达·韦德亚塔(Mohammad Nanda Widyarta)侧重的是国家的殖民建筑历史,而丹尼·维克索诺追溯从1998年之后兴起的当代独立建筑实践团队的起源,法里德·拉昆(Farid Rakun)则批判地审视如今印尼的创意产业、建筑及城市发展现状。

另一方面,本期杂志还试图捕捉当今印尼建筑的诸多新思潮。因为社会及经济的快速发展,年轻的建筑师能够有机会得到项目并实施建造。刚开始可能只是家庭住宅和别墅,但慢慢涵盖更多类型,这样的年轻事务所包括SUBd-associates、达萨工作室(Studio Dasar)、HGT建筑事务所(HGT Architects)、威利斯·库苏马(Willis Kusuma)。他们的目的是探索,虽然预算和资金有限,但是却毫不妥协地追寻一种另类的建筑语言。与此同时,一批老一辈的建筑师,如之前提到的安德拉·马汀(Andra Matin),阿迪·普尔诺摩/mamostudio(Adi Purnomo/mamostudio),艾科·普拉沃托(Eko Prawoto),ABODAY事务所和Studio TonTon工作室,在近乎10年的时间内,他们以一种辩证的眼光找寻和发现他们在国际影响和声誉下作为建筑师的角色和责任。

阿迪·普尔诺莫可能是印尼建筑里的一个例外,他的工作室mamostudio故意保持尽可能小的规模:“一个小的工作室就好像水蚊子,它贴近水面,但是不会被水包围和淹没。”这位建筑师,同时也是一位作家和研究者表示“但另一方面,人们会质疑工作室的专业性,因此我是在试验这种工作室的工作模式。”工作室里展示着建成的项目和研究性的项目,它们突出人口、食品生产、基础设施建设等问题。与这一类形成补充的是另外一种致力于非营利性或社区型建筑项目的团队,这些项目包括由艺术家/建筑师艾科·普拉沃托以社区为基础的震后重建项目,以及Rumah Asuh团队的曾获得2013阿卡汗建筑奖(Aga Khan Award for Architecture)的位于极为偏远地段的Mbaru Niang保护项目。

MovingCities 和丹尼·维克索诺在此感谢《城市空间设计》杂志为此提供的一次前所未有的展示机会与平台,使中国读者能够深入了解当代印尼建筑。

文 伯德孟 和 莫妮卡·卡瑞苏 (Bert de Muynck & Mónica Carriço) / movingcities.org
(张萃 译)2013年12月

– – – – – – – – –
INDONESIA Architecture 新兴崛起的印度尼西亚热带建筑

《Urban Flux 城市空间》#34 Indonesia Architecture | guest-edited by MovingCities 2013

About URBAN FLUX

URBAN FLUX (…) *bio to be updated soon

About MovingCities

MovingCities is a Shanghai-based think-tank investigating the role of architecture and urbanism in shaping the contemporary city. Established in 2007 by Bert de Muynck [BE] and Mónica Carriço [PT], MovingCities publishes, collaborates talks and walks, and operate as embedded architects. During the past years MovingCities has conducted research, lectures, creative consultancy and workshops in China, Israel, Sweden, Netherlands, Finland, Indonesia and Italy.

Acknowledgment

MovingCities wishes to thank the many individuals who contributed their valuable time and expertise through the interviews, texts, photography and projects that form the foundation of this issue. 感谢:MovingCities在此对接受采访、提供文字、图片以及项目案例的诸位表示由衷的感谢,感谢他们对于胡同专辑所付出的宝贵时间及专业建树。
For further inquiries, updates, background, interviews and lectures related to
URBAN FLUX #34 Indonesia Architecture contact MovingCitiesinfo [at] movingcities [dot] org

Urban Flux #34 INDONESIA Architecture TOC

《Urban Flux 城市空间设计》#34 'Indonesian Architecture' 印度尼西亚建筑 2013
URBAN FLUX magazine 《城市空间设计》VOL 34  2013年第6
Special Report 特别报道 CONTENTS 目录

INDONESIA Architecture: Tropical and Emerging

新兴崛起的印度尼西亚热带建筑
Guest-edited by 客座编辑 MovingCities
/Bert de Muynck & Mónica Carriço 伯德孟 和 莫妮卡·卡瑞苏

p.02

Discourse 论述
PREFACE 前言 
Indonesian Architecture: Tropical And Emerging
印度尼西亚:新兴崛起的热带建筑 
by MovingCities智库/ Bert de Muynck & Mónica Carriço 伯德孟 和 莫妮卡·卡瑞苏

p.12 

15 Years of Progress
不断进取的15年 
by Danny Wicaksono 丹尼·维克索诺

p.14

A Note on Indonesia’s Colonial Architecture
关于印尼的殖民主义建筑 
by Mohammad Nanda Widyarta 穆罕默德·南达·韦德亚塔 /Universitas Indonesia

p.17

Dutch Architects in the East-indies: a Critical Regional Discourse
东印度的荷兰建筑师关于批判性地域主义的讨论 
by MovingCities智库

p.21

Kampung Imaginary Battle: Woles VS. Slumdog Architecture
想象中的Kampung战役:“狼窝建筑”对“狗窝建筑” 
by Farid Rakun 法里德·拉昆/Karbon Journal

p.25

Paul Rudolph In Indonesia
保罗·鲁道夫的印尼项目 
by MovingCities智库

p.29

Projects 项目
Andra Matin PROFILE 安德拉·马汀作品集

  • Andra Matin  安德拉·马汀作品集
    by Bert de Muynck 伯德孟 /MovingCities智库
    note: a version of this text was published in MARK Magazine#44, June-July 2013

    p.32

  • Tanah Teduh “宁静之园”
    Jakarta 雅加达

    p.36

  • Rumah Agws Suwage 苏瓦吉之家 
    Yogyakarta 日惹

    p.38

  • Villa Andra Matin 安德拉·马汀之家 
    Jakarta 雅加达

    p.39

  • Cijayanti Orphanage 希杰堤孤儿院 
    Bogor 茂物

    p.40

mamostudio PROFILE mamo工作室作品集

  • Adi Purnomo / mamostudio  阿迪·普尔诺摩 /mamo工作室
    by Bert de Muynck 伯德孟 /MovingCities智库
    note: a version of this text was published in MARK Magazine#44, June-July 2013

    p.41

Studies 研究

  • Coco-building: Seeking Opportunities in Lieu of Forest Timber Research Project
    椰子树建筑:寻找代替木材源料的研究项目
    Kebumen Regency 加布棉縣

    p.44

  • “Jakarta Sponge City” Project “雅加达海绵城市” 
    Jakarta 雅加达

    p.46

Projects 项目

  • Pahoa Kindergarten 帕霍幼儿园 
    Jakarta 雅加达

    p.50

  • Villa Tanah Teduh “宁静之园”别别墅 
    Jakarta 雅加达

    p.51

  • Lau Kawar Studio 老卡瓦湖住宅项目
    Lau Kawar (North Sumatra) 老卡瓦(北苏门答腊)

    p.52

Studios 事务所
SUB PROFILE SUB工作室
[Wiyoga Nurdiansyah & Muhammad Sagitha]

p.53

  • House of Trimmed Reform 裁剪革新的住宅
    Tangeran 坦格朗

    p.54

  • Grey House 灰房子 
    Jakarta 雅加达

    p.56

  • AN House AN住宅 
    Jakarta 雅加达

    p.58

  • D Minution House D Minution住宅 
    Jakarta 雅加达

    p.60

Studio TonTon PROFILE TonTon工作室
[Antony Liu & Ferry Ridwan]

p.62

  • Bea House | a personal impression and reflection  美屋 个人印象与感悟
    by Antony Liu / Studio TonTon 安东尼·刘 / TonTon工作室
    Jakarta-Serpong . Phase I & Phase II (also FRONT COVER feature)

    p.63

  • Ize Hotel Ize 酒店
    Bali 巴厘岛

    p.68

Studio Dasar PROFILE 达萨工作室
[Danny Wicaksono 丹尼·维克索诺]

p.70

  • Anjung Salihara Anjung Salihara项目
    by Bert de Muynck 伯德孟 /MovingCities智库
    Jakarta 雅加达

    p.71

d-associates PROFILE d-associates事务所
[Gregorius Supie Yolodi & Maria Rosantina]

p.74

  • Kalibata House  卡里巴达屋
    Jakarta 雅加达 (also BACK COVER feature, photo by Mario Wibowa)

    p.75

  • Tamarind House 罗望子之家
    Jakarta Cirendeu 雅加达

    p.78

HGT Architects PROFILE  HGT事务所
[Henry G. Tjhi 池泓慶]

  • House 6 6号房
    Jakarta 雅加达

    p.81

Willis Kusuma Architects PROFILE 威利斯·库苏马建筑事务所

  • GF House GF房
    Jakarta 雅加达

    p.84

ABODAY PROFILE  ABODAY事务所
[Rafael David, Ary Indra, Johanses Yap]

p.88

  • Khalifa IMS  Khalifa IMS学校
    Bintaro, Tangerang 丹格朗

    p.89

Community Projects 社区项目
Reconstruction of Ngibikan Village in Yogyakarta, Indonesia 
印度尼西亚日惹Ngibikan村重建- 布里吉特·沈
[Eko Prawoto 艾科·普拉沃托]
2010 On Site Review Report – by Brigitte Shim for Aga Khan Award for Architecture
2010年基地评审报告-布里吉特·沈

p.91

RUMAH ASUH Team RUMAH ASUH团队
Preservation of the Mbaru Niang Conical Houses: WAE REBO Case Study
Mbaru Niang“圆锥形”住宅的保护工作:WAE REBO瓦尔博村案例分析
by Rumah Asuh 团队/Yori Antar
West Flores, East Nusa Tenggara

p.94

Exhibition Project 展览项目
“Rumah Rumah Tanpa Pintu” (Houses Without Doors) Exhibition
“RUMAH RUMAH TANPA PINTU”没有门的房子展览
by Danny Wicaksono 丹尼·维克索诺

p.94

《Urban Flux 城市空间》#34 Indonesia Architecture | guest-edited by MovingCities 2013

– – – – – – – – – – – –

Urban Flux #34 written by and/or featured:
MovingCities [Bert de Muynck & Mónica Carriço 伯德孟莫妮卡·卡瑞苏]; Studio Dasar 达萨工作室 [Danny Wicaksono 丹尼·维克索诺]; Mohammad Nanda Widyarta 穆罕默德·南达·韦德亚塔  (Universitas Indonesia); Farid Rakun 法里德·拉昆 (Karbon Journal); Andra Matin; mamostudio mamo工作室作品集 [Adi Purnomo 阿迪·普尔诺摩]; SUB [Wiyoga Nurdiansyah & Muhammad Sagitha]; Studio TonTon  [Antony Liu & Ferry Ridwan]; d-associates [Gregorius Supie Yolodi & Maria Rosantina]; HGT Architects [Henry G. Tjhi 池泓慶]; Willis Kusuma Architects 威利斯·库苏马建筑; ABODAY [Rafael David, Ary Indra, Johanses Yap]; Eko Prawoto 艾科·普拉沃托 (Duta Wacana Christian University); Brigitte Shim 布里吉特·沈 (John H. Daniels Faculty)Rumah Asuh Team团队 / Yori AntarJongArsitek!.

URBAN FLUX 城市空间VOL 34 2013年第6期

‘Indonesian Architecture’ 印度尼西亚建筑 Special Report 特别报道 
Guest-editors 客座编辑: MovingCities (Bert de Muynck 伯德孟  & Mónica Carriço 莫妮卡·卡瑞苏)
Front cover: 封面: Studio TonTon工作室 (p.62) Bea House, Jakarta-Serpong 美屋, 雅加达 
Back cover  封底: d-associates事务所 (p.74) Kalibata House, Jakarta卡里巴达屋, 雅加达 Photo by Mario Wibowa

Urban Flux #34 | INDONESIA Architecture | covers

– – – – – – – – – – – –

URBAN FLUX 城市空间 
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PUBLICATION DATE 出版日期: Bimonthly (on the 16th) 逢双月16日
ISSN 出版国际刊号: ISSN 1008-2832 中图发行代理刊号: 860Y0002
PRICE 定价: 每本零售 HK $70.00, RMB ¥35.00  人民币35元 [€14.00]

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INDONESIA Architecture 新兴崛起的印度尼西亚热带建筑

  • see《UrbanFlux城市空间#34 INDONESIA  Preface by MovingCities
  • see《UrbanFlux城市空间》#34 INDONESIA  Project Page 
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About URBAN FLUX

URBAN FLUX (…) *bio to be updated soon

About MovingCities

MovingCities is a Shanghai-based think-tank investigating the role of architecture and urbanism in shaping the contemporary city. Established in 2007 by Bert de Muynck [BE] and Mónica Carriço [PT], MovingCities publishes, collaborates talks and walks, and operate as embedded architects. During the past years MovingCities has conducted research, lectures, creative consultancy and workshops in China, Israel, Sweden, Netherlands, Finland, Indonesia and Italy.

Acknowledgment

MovingCities wishes to thank the many individuals who contributed their valuable time and expertise through the interviews, texts, photography and projects that form the foundation of this issue. 感谢:MovingCities在此对接受采访、提供文字、图片以及项目案例的诸位表示由衷的感谢,感谢他们对于胡同专辑所付出的宝贵时间及专业建树。
For further inquiries, updates, background, interviews and lectures related to
URBAN FLUX #34 Indonesia Architecture contact MovingCitiesinfo [at] movingcities [dot] org

Urban Flux #34 | INDONESIA Architecture

《Urban Flux 城市空间设计》#34 Indonesia Architecture | guest-edited by MovingCities

Urban Flux magazine #34 | ‘INDONESIA Architecture’
guest-edited by MovingCities [September _December 2013]

Published in December 2013, MovingCities guest-edited a special bilingual 90-page issue of the Chinese architecture magazine Urban Flux 城市空间 设计 [volume 34/2013-6] entitled “INDONESIAN ARCHITECTURE: TROPICAL AND EMERGING” 新兴崛起的印度尼西亚热带建筑.

Commissioned by URBAN FLUX  城市空间 设计 [chengshi kongjian~urban space design], an architectural and urbanism magazine hosted by Tianjin University, this especial report gives to a Chinese and international public, for the first time, a comprehensive overview of contemporary Indonesian architectural practices.

With Indonesian Architecture: Tropical and Emerging, MovingCities along with Indonesian architect Danny Wicaksono, provide an insight into contemporary tropical architectural design, by focusing on what local architects have constructed, researched and learned – throughout the past decade.

mamostudio [interview] | MovingCities

Andra Matin [interview] | MovingCities

Rumah Rumah Tanpa Pintu (Houses Without Doors) Exhibition 2011 | MovingCities

Next to introducing historical depth to the discourse on contemporary Indonesian architecture – whether developed by Dutch [Hendrik Petrus Berlage (1856-1934), C.P. Wolff Schoemaker (1882-1949)], under colonial circumstances, or by American architects [Paul Rudolph (1918-1997)], prior to the 1990s recession – this 90-pages magazine introduces the dawn of a new architectural awareness (and generation of young architects) that are poised to change the architecture of today’s Indonesia. These include Andra Matin, mamostudio, SUB, Studio TonTon, Studio Dasar, d-associates, Willis Kusuma Architects, ABODAY and HGT Architects.

Complementing these architectural practices, emphasis was placed on non-profit and community based architectural endeavors, hence the inclusion of artist/architect Eko Prawoto’s community-based reconstruction of an earthquake stricken area – “Nqibikan Village Reconstruction” (short-listed in 2010’s Aga Khan Award for Architecture); and the Rumah Asuh’s “Preservation of the Mbaru Niang”-project (winner of the aforementioned award, in 2013), led by architect Yori Antar.

To know more about this issue, consult its Table of Contents & Colophon, read our Preface; or order《Urban Flux城市空间》volume 34 online >.
Scroll below to see a preview of the magazine.

Urban Flux #34 | covers: d-associates's Kalibata House & Studio TonTon's Bea House

《Urban FLux 城市空间》INDONESIA Architecture | MovingCities Preface

'A Note on Indonesia’s Colonial Architecture' -by Mohammad Nanda Widyarta

《Urban FLux 城市空间》INDONESIA Architecture | Andra Matin & Tanah Teduh project

《Urban FLux 城市空间》INDONESIA Architecture | mamostudio & Coco-building project

《Urban FLux 城市空间》SUB & House of Trimmed Reform/Grey House

《Urban FLux 城市空间》INDONESIA Architecture | Studio TonTon & Bea House

《Urban FLux 城市空间》INDONESIA Architecture | Studio Dasar & Anjung Salihara

Preservation of the Mbaru Niang Conical Houses: WAE REBO Case Study - Rumah Asuh/Yori Antar

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Urban Flux #34 written by and/or featured:
MovingCities [Bert de Muynck & Mónica Carriço 伯德孟莫妮卡·卡瑞苏]; Studio Dasar 达萨工作室 [Danny Wicaksono 丹尼·维克索诺]; Mohammad Nanda Widyarta 穆罕默德·南达·韦德亚塔  (Universitas Indonesia); Farid Rakun 法里德·拉昆 (Karbon Journal); Andra Matin; mamostudio mamo工作室作品集 [Adi Purnomo 阿迪·普尔诺摩]; SUB [Wiyoga Nurdiansyah & Muhammad Sagitha]; Studio TonTon  [Antony Liu & Ferry Ridwan]; d-associates [Gregorius Supie Yolodi & Maria Rosantina]; HGT Architects [Henry G. Tjhi 池泓慶]; Willis Kusuma Architects 威利斯·库苏马建筑; ABODAY [Rafael David, Ary Indra, Johanses Yap]; Eko Prawoto 艾科·普拉沃托 (Duta Wacana Christian University); Brigitte Shim 布里吉特·沈 (John H. Daniels Faculty)Rumah Asuh Team团队 / Yori AntarJongArsitek!.

URBAN FLUX 城市空间VOL 34 2013年第6期

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URBAN FLUX 城市空间 
Editorial Office – Executive Editor in Chief, Miss Lu Jun 卢军  and Executive Editor Li Yi 李逸
To subscribe please contact Chen Xianhong 陈宪红 (+861085912794/urbanflux@aliyun.com)
ISSN 出版国际刊号: ISSN 1008-2832 中图发行代理刊号: 860Y0002
PRICE 定价: 每本零售 HK $70.00, RMB ¥35.00  人民币35元 [€14.00]

– – – – – – – – – – – –

INDONESIA Architecture 新兴崛起的印度尼西亚热带建筑

– – – – – – – – –
About URBAN FLUX

URBAN FLUX (…) *bio to be updated soon

About MovingCities

MovingCities is a Shanghai-based think-tank investigating the role of architecture and urbanism in shaping the contemporary city. Established in 2007 by Bert de Muynck [BE] and Mónica Carriço [PT], MovingCities publishes, collaborates talks and walks, and operate as embedded architects. During the past years MovingCities has conducted research, lectures, creative consultancy and workshops in China, Israel, Sweden, Netherlands, Finland, Indonesia and Italy.

Acknowledgment

MovingCities wishes to thank the many individuals who contributed their valuable time and expertise through the interviews, texts, photography and projects that form the foundation of this issue. 感谢:MovingCities在此对接受采访、提供文字、图片以及项目案例的诸位表示由衷的感谢,感谢他们对于胡同专辑所付出的宝贵时间及专业建树。

For further inquiries, updates, background, interviews and lectures related to
URBAN FLUX #34 Indonesia Architecture contact MovingCitiesinfo [at] movingcities [dot] org

Adi Purnomo | MARK magazine#44

Mark Magazine#44 | Adi Purnomo | MovingCities

MovingCities published in the June-July 2013 issue of Mark magazine #44 an interview with Indonesian architect Adi Purnomo. In 2009, when we reported on a house and studio that he had designed for a photographer and art collector in Jakarta, we talked about architecture without air conditioning as part of a strategy tailored to the demands of a tropical climate (Green and Tidy, Mark 21, page 154).
It’s a strategy that still forms his point of departure, but today he has other concerns as well. For starters, he wants to accelerate his output. Read the full interview. Continue reading “Adi Purnomo | MARK magazine#44”

mamostudio: Adi Purnomo interview [2013]

Mark Magazine#44 | Adi Purnomo | MovingCities

Adi Purnomo of Mamo Studio has changed his attitude towards architecture and the profession. In 2009, when I reported on a house and studio that he had designed for a photographer and art collector in Jakarta, we talked about architecture without air conditioning as part of a strategy tailored to the demands of a tropical climate (Green and Tidy, Mark 21, page 154). It’s a strategy that still forms his point of departure, but today he has other concerns as well. For starters, he wants to accelerate his output.

When we meet again, Purnomo says he’s working on about ten projects. ‘In 2009 I had just opened my office, and I was playing around too much. If you were to ask what’s different now, I’d reply that I try to meet new people and new types of clients. Rather than attempting to figure out what makes a good design, I want to know what obstructs an efficient building process. I don’t know the answer to that question, but I’m working on it – by forcing myself, for example, to follow a tight schedule in order to discover whether I can still deliver good work in less time.

Ten projects – among them a couple of villas, a public park, a governmental building and a school – are a lot for a small office like Mamo, which consists of Purnomo and only a handful of employees. Factor into the equation the fact that design and construction are only two of his activities. He’s also engaged in research into the smart use of Indonesia’s resources in urban environments. This is not speculative or abstract research, but a series of highly meticulous studies, such as one he shows me with detailed lists of materials: cost, weight, carbon-emission data, productive potential et cetera. ‘One of my studies shows the results of only one Bandung university relocating to a spot 40 km outside the congested city centre,’ he says, zipping through slides of his research. ‘What is the impact of such a move? Can you estimate the effect of moving only one function? This study shows a considerable impact. Indonesians believe in modernizing the country, but what kind of modernization do we want? Currently, my conclusion is that the future of the town lies in the countryside, which has two vital resources: food and timber. Cities are built only for consumption. So why not spread out and be closer to our natural resources?

A major issue is the nation’s (un)willingness to accept new architectural ideas. Purnomo believes that architects should be given the status they merit. ‘In big cities, architecture is beginning to be recognized as a profession that deserves more attention,’ he says. ‘But in general, people in Indonesia know nothing about the discipline and have no appreciation of the built environment. Most are prepared to accept anything, good or bad. The concept of acceptance is simply part of our lives. We even seem to accept corruption.

Mark Magazine#44 | Adi Purnomo | MovingCities

Tucked away in a corner of Tanah Teduh, a 20,000-m2 gated community in Jakarta, Purnomo’s house – one of 20 large residences within the boundaries of the project – is under construction when I visit. In an earlier conversation with Andra Matin, the man responsible for the master plan, Matin had related the saga of the house in question: ‘Purnomo designed many alternatives for this house, maybe 12 or 15. Every time we met, he had a new idea. The frustrated developer told him repeatedly to stop thinking. “We’re out of time,” he said. “Start building.”

So it’s no surprise to find Purnomo at the building site, engaged in intense conversation with a team of construction workers. ‘I enjoy improvising during construction,’ Purnomo says, more or less negating his assertion about keeping to a tight schedule. ‘When I see the spaces actually being created, I add extra touches here and there, like this extruded beam. I want this house to represent a dialogue between timber and glass: rough versus smooth. I like to experiment. I enjoy having the construction workers interpret my design. But not every contractor can work like this, and I’ve never done it before either. Building this house, I’ve come to realize that making decisions on site is a method of working we seem to have forgotten about.

Adi Purnomo | Tanah Teduh, Jakarta, 2011

Purnomo’s choice of timber for the house is ulin, or ironwood, which withstands the conditions of a humid, tropical climate. Purnomo found the wood in Samarinda, a city in East Borneo, where it was part of an old pier on the Mahakam River. Following the demolition of the pier, the architect bid for the timber, which he recycled for use at Tanah Teduh. ‘In Indonesia, wood and bamboo are still the most commonly used materials because of the climate. It’s challenging to find ways to replace concrete with timber. I still see wood as an ideal renewable resource.’ Purnomo says that, with his design for this villa, he hopes to promote awareness of the disastrous deforestation of Indonesia – and to reach a wide audience with his message.

Ironwood was used to build the oldest traditional structures in Borneo, which have been standing for more than 300 years. ‘Why does our traditional architecture last so long?’ he asks rhetorically. ‘These buildings have stood the test of time because they absorb both tangible and intangible influences. Architecture is not only physical structures but also an expression of culture. To get a better understanding of the building process, architects should involve artisans and builders in their designs. We need everyone’s expertise. The resulting building will have a far better dynamic than you get when an architect hands exact specifications to the construction workers and asks for strict execution of what’s on paper. Today, we have lost the dialogue between thinkers and makers.

Mark Magazine#44 | Adi Purnomo | MovingCities

Back at the office, we talk about a school Mamo Studio recently completed in Jakarta. Purnomo says the big white building ‘was not supposed to have air conditioning, but during the design process the parents asked us to install air conditioning.’ The interiors are well protected from direct sunlight, and a large space at the entrance satisfies the need for a drop-off area that accommodates cars, as ‘there is no school bus.’ The design is quite removed from Mamo’s normal style. Because it is all white, the building has been criticized, according to Purnomo, as being ‘not tropical at all. But my objective was to manage the humidity and temperature inside. Tropical architecture should be like a thermosflask, with the highest temperatures at the top, good air circulation and double walls. I combined these elements with a garden on theroof. Trees provide additional cooling.

Another Mamo project is in Banyuwangi, a city at the eastern tip of East Java, where the team transformed a historical central area, originally closed off, into a public park, with a youth hostel hidden below the grass. Purnomo says his goal was to breathe new life into the place, which he seems to have achieved, as ‘people enjoy walking around there.’ We also discuss a guesthouse in Bali, where he made use of the experience of local bricklayers to experiment with red brick. Subtly hidden steel components allowed him to erect a façade with an incredibly sharp angle. The necessity to find a ‘new construction method for an old material’ is the basis for his uncommon exploration of craftsmanship. Efforts to imbue his work with a range of requests from everyone involved, however, often land him in the middle of a conflict. ‘A dialogue often results in opposing views. I have to accept that what I do is not perfect.

Mark Magazine#44 | Adi Purnomo | MovingCities

mamostudio | House in Bogor [2012]

The last project that comes under review is a holiday house near Medan, which has an average temperature of 15 degrees C. ‘That’s really cold for Indonesia,’ says Purnomo. ‘I capture and keep the sunlight inside the house, so that it still feels warm at ten in the evening.’ He used corrugated polycarbonate sheets on exterior walls to create a thermos-in-reverse system that stops warm air from circulating freely, confining it inside the house. ‘The house is so popular among my clients’ friends that they hardly have time to enjoy it themselves.’ These clients are planning to build another house next door.

The project prompts me to ask how he feels about working on commissions so far away from his office. ‘I have to deal with not being able to supervise the execution properly,
he says, ‘especially when contact between the site and our office is poor. Sometimes I go to check things out, and they’ve already solved the problem on their own.’ What has he learned from such experiences? ‘That if God is in the details, I’m an atheist.

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Pictures by Mónica Carriço /movingcities.org

Adi Purnomo | Interview [2013] by Bert de Muynck
published in Mark magazine #44 | June-July 2013

(back to movingcities interviews page)

Previous publications

mamostudio | House in Bogor [2008] | MovingCities

mamostudio | Puri Indah [2009] | Mark Magazine#21 | MovingCities